What’s My Purpose? The 2 Main Reasons I Write

Composite image of thoughtful woman posing in dress with speech bubble
Image purchased from Thinkstockphoto.com

It’s a question I get often, but not in the way you’d imagine. The email drops in my inbox, and there it is:  “Why don’t you share the plan of salvation in your books?  How will people know how to get saved if you don’t share it?” Now, it rarely is worded exactly like that, but if you condense the questions into two main sentences, that’s what you get.  My answer, I think, surprises them.

I don’t write evangelistic fiction.  My target audience isn’t the seeker, the atheist, the agnostic, or the floundering.  That sounds so horrible when I type it out, but it’s true.  I have one primary goal as an author:

I write to encourage the body of Christ.

That’s it.  That’s my goal.  My target audience is comprised of Christians who need, ache, love to see how other Christians (through fictional characters) live out their faith.  I write to show that Christians are real, flawed, hurting, struggling people who have messy lives.  I don’t write edgy fiction as a general rule.  That’s not my strength.  I leave that to authors like Tammy Gray.

“But what about people who are searching for Jesus?”  They still come.  I have a Jewish reader, I have several pagans, and  I have people who inform me that they “aren’t religious” but they love the characters and story lines.  I find it interesting that I receive emails (sometimes on the same day) that say, “Your books have brought me back to Jesus” (I almost weep over those, and I’m not a crier!) and emails that say, “It’s so nice that a religious book doesn’t shove the Bible down my throat.”  When Doctorow said that writers are schizophrenics, I think he got it right.

Of course, occasionally, someone in one of my books will come to Jesus.  It happened in Discovering Hope, it happened in Not a Word, and it happened in Effective Immediately.  It’s gonna happen sometimes.  But when I write those stories, it’s kind of how I love my romance–as a natural outpouring from a life lived rather than center stage.  Because I think Christians often wonder how to share Jesus with others without ramming Him down their throats.  They don’t want to be timid.  They don’t want to be a “Bible thumper.”  They just want to share Jesus.  So sometimes, people in my books share Jesus.  But I write that scene to encourage Christians.  If it helps someone who isn’t a Christian see Jesus as his or her Savior and repent, well hallelujah!  I am thrilled.  It’s just not why I wrote it.

I write to “stimulate one another to love and good deeds.”  This is what my characters do.  They are faced with situations and eventually approach the solution as they see Scripture advising.

Got a secret for you:  I don’t always agree with their solution. But the point is, they look to Jesus–His Word–for that solution.  And that’s my goal as an author.  To encourage the body of Christ–to turn to the Word of God, the Bible, for the solutions and inspirations in their lives. 

That’s it.

Okay, I have one more reason (hence, why I said two!).  I also write because I have these stories filling my head. Sometimes, I feel like I’m going to explode.  I get new ideas daily.  Most are easily adjusted to be parts of other stories, but I scroll through stock photos in search for an image for a blog post (like this one) and there it is.  A photo.  And with it comes an idea–a fun idea.  I pop it in a lightbox (a fancy word for a file folder on the stock site).  Then I come back later for it.  Or that’s the theory, anyway.  My most recent one sent me in search of another picture.  And another.  Why?  Because I instantly saw a trilogy–three women, friends, who met on the same day in the 7th grade and now each is facing a huge fear in her life.  THREE BOOKS.

This is how my brain works every day.  So, I write for two reasons.  One is deep, spiritual, and meaningful–I write to encourage the body of Christ.  The other… well, that’s just a feeble attempt to de-clutter my overstuffed brain shelves.  It’s hopeless, isn’t it?

Who Needs Some Summer Reading?

1-pfAshley was in quite a mood for this week, apparently. She decided, “Why put three volumes on sale, when we could discount all six?” Yep, you read that right. I promised additional blog posts with the other volumes, but since we’re doing all SIX volumes now, I’m going to just publish this blog post with the links for all six volumes that are on sale. Additionally, I’m including the corrected links for Episode 9 and Episode 10, which somehow got mixed up before. Ashley  has put these on a Kindle Countdown Deal starting at .99 right now and the sale will last a week. Volume I , Volume II,  Volume III,  Volume IV, Volume V and Volume VI.
If you’re willing to help share this with your friends, please consider doing one or the more of the following and also get your entries in for the Amazon gift card giveaway. Your entries will earn you a chance at one of four $5 gift cards! The first promo is on THIS blog post, so get your entries in there, then get additional entries at the bottom of this post.
 *please note: links to my books are affiliate links and as such, I may receive advertising compensation from Amazon.
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Pin the covers on Pinterest: Volume IV, Volume V, and Volume VI.
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Willow WOWsday!!!

1-pfWe’re continuing on for the fifth week in our Summer Reading Program. If you’re new with us, Past Forward is the original series that I published in bite sized pieces called episodes. Over the course of the summer, we’re giving away those episodes each week, two at a time, along with 2 episodes each week of my current series, HearthLand. So, Past Forward Episode 9 and Episode 10 will both be free today and tomorrow (Wednesday and Thursday). **AND** today, Volume I will be .99, Thursday, Volume II will be .99, and Friday, Volume III will be .99. (there will be separate blog posts for the second and third volumes on the days they’re on sale– so, some of the entries on the promo simple widget will be for sharing on the other days) If you’re willing to help share this with your friends, please consider doing one or the more of the following and also get your entries in for the Amazon gift card giveaway. Your entries will earn you a chance at one of two $5 gift cards! Please, step on over to Amazon and download them! And please, even if you’ve previously downloaded these episodes, grab ’em again.  MOST have been revised and updated. For those who are Kobo or Nook readers, email me.  I’ve got you covered. *please note: links to my books are affiliate links and as such, I may receive advertising compensation from Amazon. Like our Facebook Page/Post Tweet this giveaway Pin the covers on Pinterest: Episode 9 and Episode 10. Download Episode 9  and Episode 10. Comment Request: Are you looking forward to the non-fiction book about living intentionally… Living Past Forward?

A Day in the Life of Ralph

How’s your summer going? Are you staying busy? The range of weather across the country is astounding. Some areas are experiencing drought, while others are getting flooded out. Some are unseasonably cool while others are burning up. Lots of variety. I like variety, which is why we’re giving away episodes from two different series.

Join us for our Summer of Reading Program! Each week this summer, we’re giving away a total of 4 episodes. Two of HearthLand, and two of Past Forward.

To start off the week,  HearthLand Episode 9  and Episode 10 will both be free Monday and Tuesday. **PLUS** The episode you’ve been patiently waiting for! Episode 29 will be free at the same time.

There will be a blog post on Wednesday, giving details on the Past Forward episodes Don’t miss it!

If you’re willing to help share this with your friends, please consider doing one or the more of the following:

Please, step on over to Amazon and download them! And please, even if you’ve previously downloaded these episodes, grab ’em again.  Some have been updated. For those who are Kobo or Nook readers, email me.  I’ve got you covered. *please note: links to my books are affiliate links and as such, I may receive advertising compensation from Amazon.

Like our Facebook Page/Post
Tweet this giveaway
Pin the covers on Pinterest: Episode 9 and Episode 10.
Download Episode 9  and Episode 10.
Comment Request:
What’s your vote.  Will Annie ever go back to her old name?

5 Ways to Ruin a Good Book

Image purchased from Thinkstock.com
Image purchased from Thinkstock.com

Ever tried to enjoy something and the person next to you couldn’t resist telling you EVERYTHING wrong with it?

What does this have to do with how to ruin good books?  Well… imagine sitting in a room with me.  I’m reading a book.  I huff.  I grunt.  I almost scream  sometimes.  You look over and naively ask the last thing you really should.  “What’s wrong?”

I guarantee you… you do not want to ask that question.  Why?

I’ve become one of THOSE people.

You know, the ones who watch a movie with you and tell you all the wrong things the detective is doing or explain, in long, agonizing, technical terms that no one but they know or care to know just how bad the camera shot is.  Or you watch ice skating, and they shred the performance that you just enjoyed.

I do it with books now.  I read and find myself almost weeping as I see passive voice or sentence phrasing that I despise–like “It was he who” or “It was the dog that.”  NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO  don’t.  My eyes bleed.  Please. Don’t.  I know great authors have done it for centuries, but … *whimpers*

God has a sense of humor.  I planned this blog post a few days ago, and then a day or two later, I got in the car and began singing as I drove down the road.  Adios, amigo. Adios, my friend… the road we have traveled…” Sang as I passed a guy crossing the street at the oddest place possible.  Sang as I rounded the corner and waved at a police officer.  Sang… right until I choked.  One of my favorite songs–ruined!  Why?  Because of my distaste for “It was he/she who”!!!  Here I’m singing along, blissfully unaware that my world is about to be rocked.  “When two love the same love, one love has to lose… and it’s you who she longs for…”  And if that’s not bad enough, the next line… “It’s you she will choose.”

My teeth began to itch.  I couldn’t finish singing it.  One of my favorite songs of all times, and my own writing preferences had killed joy in my life–just as others’ had done to me with other topics.

One of the things I learned in the early days of writing is that you should never write, “It was he/she who” or “It was it that…”  and things like that.  It’s a convoluted way of writing, “He/she [acted]”  or “It [acted]”.    So instead of writing, “It was the butler who killed the mouse with the carving knife,” you write, “The butler crushed the mouse…”  Grant you, I am just grateful that mouse got killed, okay?  But seriously–three unnecessary words right there that weaken your statement!

Of course, that’s not the only thing.  I now read books and spend half my time refocusing.  I used to be able to read a full-length (about 90k words) Christian novel in 2-2.5 hours.  Now it takes me 3-4.  Why?  Because I have to stop and tell myself that it’s not my story.  I have to ignore things like passive writing, sentences masquerading as passive writing, too much telling and not enough showing… you know the drill.  Since becoming an author, I’ve had to learn to turn off the inner editor.  I’ve had to learn to respect another author’s voice again.  When you write–all day every day–your voice becomes such a part of who you are and how you see things that it’s easy to expect everyone to do it “your way.”  Oh, the arrogance!

And I know how others feel.  Because I’ve been that person on the couch next to the critic who can’t let me watch the thing I was enjoying (you have no idea how hard it is for me to leave that there–was enjoying.  Bad, Chautona.  BAD). I’ve been the one aching to live in ignorant bliss of the inferiority of the things that my watching buddy can’t endure.

So here we are.  Five ways to ruin a good book.

  1. Become a writer:  The more you learn about the craft of writing, the more you struggle reading things that don’t resonate with you.
  2. Become an editor:  After speaking with my editors and friends who are editors, I’ve learned that they too struggle with just relaxing and enjoying a good book because they are so used to looking for the slightest flaws.
  3. Stoke your arrogance:  Because only arrogance says, “You should do it my way.”  So when you find yourself enjoying a book–no bleeding eyes or itching teeth–just poke the arrogance flame a few times.  Can’t possibly have you enjoying a book as is, can we?  *cough*
  4. Repent of your hypocrisy:  No, really.  I’m not a fan of first-person writing, but I particularly despise first-person/present tense.  Oh, it does horrible things to my senses.  I can almost feel the words taunting me with each, “The door opens before me and the sight within sends shivers down my spine.”  Yeah.  That sentence does that to me too–like fingernails on a chalkboard shivers.  But, I was smart.  I didn’t repent of my hypocrisy.  And I enjoyed the Hunger Games trilogy despite the dreaded first-person/present tense.  So see… if you want to ruin a good book, repent!  If you hate third person, repent!  (And then you’d probably better stop reading my books because I don’t see myself giving up third person anytime soon…  😉
  5. If you can’t ruin it for yourself by one of the above methods, there’s always the tried and true, “Find an error–even if it’s only that the author’s experience differs from yours.”  So the author infers that you can learn to roller skate in buffalo herds, and you’ve got the battle scars to prove that Roger Miller was right.  Let everyone know how messed up that author is!  Trust me.  If you can’t ruin it for you, you’ll ruin it for someone else!  And that’s the goal right?  I mean, this isn’t, “Five ways to find a good book…”  That title would just make too much sense.

So, there you have it.  You should be set for ensuring that you have lots of time freed up on your calendar.  By the time you finish this, you shouldn’t need to read again for a long time.   Enjoy whatever it is  you find to do to fill all that time you save by not reading.  But shh… don’t tell Willow.  She might have something to say about that.

Oh… and my song… I am now that annoying person who sings the lyrics wrong. (You know, the ones I used to grind my teeth over because they got it…well, wrong!)  I now sing, “And you… she longs for.  You’re who she will choose…”  WOOHOO!  *blush*

Recap: A Chat with Willow

This was originally posted in July of 2012, but with the relaunch of the Past Forward episodes, I thought I’d republish it.

Every day I get half a dozen emails about Willow asking questions, making observations, and begging for more. For those who have taken the time to encourage me, I really want to thank you! It’s so cool to open my email and see, “I want to BE Willow.” It assures me that I’ve accomplished my goal– making Willow as appealing and yet unique as possible.

Additionally, I get questions, so I’ve arranged an “interview” with Willow–just a little conversation to answer some of the questions out there. :)

Chautona: Thanks for taking time out of your busy schedule to talk to me.

Willow: Not at all. It’s the least that I could do.

Chautona: So why do you think people are so drawn to you?

Willow: I don’t know that it’s me–I think that people are drawn to a life lived with purpose and not decided by culture or society. They may not want it for themselves, but they enjoy escaping into world different from their own.

Chautona: I disagree. I think you have qualities people admire. For example, you say what you think. It disconcerts people at times, but there’s something refreshing about knowing exactly what someone thinks rather than what they think you are comfortable hearing.

Willow: But isn’t that just an extension of my life? It’s how we lived. If Mother hadn’t encouraged me to be forthright, how would I be any different than anyone else? (chuckles)

Chautona: What amuses you?

Willow: I just remembered Chuck. People don’t like his forthrightness at all.

Chautona: Which proves my point exactly. Have you found it difficult to adjust to “regular life?”

Willow: Am I supposed to? I wasn’t trying to adjust to anything. This is just my life. I’m adding a few things to it, sure, but what most people consider “regular” isn’t my regular.

Chautona: So things that are unfamiliar…

Willow: Some things will always be unfamiliar. Even if I’ve seen them before, how they are used or explained by people are different. Bill sees things differently than Chad does. Chuck is almost from another planet, and then it’s as if women speak a different language and have different eyes than men. I’ve never experienced anything like that before. It’s hard to keep the nuances straight sometimes. *chuckles* I should probably admit that I don’t try very often.

Chautona: You don’t try what? To keep them straight?”

Willow: Right. I mean, sometimes I know what someone means, but it’s hard to articulate it if I’ve never discussed it before. Mother told me about a lot of things and she probably told me about more than I know and less than she thought.

Chautona: I’m not sure I understand you.

Willow: Well, take cars, for example. I knew about them. I knew they were much faster than walking. I’d seen them whiz by the farm, sometimes being chased by a police car. Mother considered them dangerous, so I didn’t give a lot of thought to them–just to knowing I was never, ever, ever to get in one. The first time I got in Chad’s cruiser, I was astounded at how fast things flew by. It was like being on the zip-line, but faster. Sure, I knew they went fifty-five miles per hour, and that at best, I walk about four. Thirteen times faster is one thing in your head. It’s another when you first get inside and experience it. It takes getting used to.

Chautona: Kind of like when I went to my first rock concert. I’d heard of people screaming and passing out, but I didn’t know until they set me in front of those person-high speakers that it was because it killed their ears and destroyed their equilibrium.

Willow: So that’s why you made me go to that movie with the camera spinning in circles!

Chautona: Hey, I needed some good return for that horrible experience. If it helps, you aren’t alone. My friend puked after the Keira Knightley Pride and Prejudice.

Willow: Is what you just said intelligible to you?

Chautona: Yes, why?

Willow: At least one of us understands you.

Chautona: Why did your mother choose not to have anything to do with the locals? Some people talked about her, but it doesn’t seem like they even knew where she lived. Chad said he thought that the reclusive woman he’d heard of (Kari) lived on the other side of the lake.

Willow: Well, Mother had been hurt. I mean, that’s obvious. I think she would have been open to being friendly with people if she wasn’t trying to protect me–

Chautona: Wait, what do you mean, “protect you?” Why did she think she had to do that?

Willow: The man gave her a check–paid her off. He didn’t know about me, though. I’m proof of what his son did, though. If he knew, he might want to hurt me, so she wanted to be “gone.”

Chautona: And so she just ignored people?

Willow: It was more active than that. She made herself standoffish. She spoke as if she lived in the other direction. I think I remember walking the other way when I had to come with her as a child. I remember a highway, but that first morning– the trip into town–it was so much faster than I remembered. After I thought about it for a while, I realized that we never walked down the driveway. We walked along the river, around the lake, and came into town from the other side.

Chautona: But someone had to know where you lived–the feed and seed people for example. Maybe a mail carrier?

Willow: Yes, the Brant’s Corners feed people knew, but they didn’t know much. A few others… But Mother didn’t socialize. She kept to herself, ordered her things, and if it had to be delivered, she didn’t use Fairbury when we could help it. We’re five miles out of town in the opposite direction of most people. If you want people to leave you alone, if you rarely ever come into town, people forget you.

Chautona: I suppose. I’ve lived that a few times myself. My father appreciated his privacy much in the same way as Kari. I can see that.

Willow: I don’t think that would surprise anyone. People live in small neighborhoods without ever knowing the person next door. Why is it so strange that people wouldn’t know us when we’re rarely in town and don’t talk to people when we are–well, were. As soon as I started coming to town and interacted with people, they knew me, greeted me, and things were more…

Chautona: I believe the word is normal.

Willow: Well, more normal for others, I guess. It’s not normal for me. I’m still getting used to it. I like it in small spurts, but I get overwhelmed. I don’t know how people handle being inundated with people around them all the time. That girl with all the kids–Aggie–I’d go crazy. I know I would. Sometimes Chad stopping in or even calling—oh, how I want to throw that phone away some days–is just enough to make me tell him never to come around again. I want to revert into Mother’s cocoon and stay there where I’m protected from being smothered by people.

Chautona: I suppose that some of it is stuff you just don’t care about too. We tend not to pay attention to things that don’t interest us.

Willow: Exactly!

Chautona: Was it really so weird to use a phone for the first time?

Willow: Actually, it was. I mean, I’ve read books where people used them, but I never read anything about how small they are! It sounds so much simpler when you read about someone picking up a phone and dialing than to have to program numbers in and stuff like that.

Chautona: Well, you probably read about landlines rather than cell phones. House phones are bigger.

Willow: I also read about people saying “hello” when they picked up the phone, but I forgot about that. That happens a lot. Like I said, using that kind of information is very different than just reading about it.

Chautona: At least your mother educated you. I’m trying to write about a girl whose father kept her hidden all her life. Didn’t teach her anything. Nothing. Not how to read, how to write, how to do anything. She’s a virtual prisoner in an abandoned place. I keep trying to give her knowledge that she simply wouldn’t have.

Willow: Now that would be horrible. I’m grateful that Mother loved me. I love my life and I had almost twenty-three wonderful years with her. I can’t complain about that.

Chautona: But you want to.

Willow: Yes. I miss her. She filled in gaps for me. Things like how I could have so much money. I knew that man paid her a lot; I knew that money made interest, but until you hear Bill say, “You are a wealthy woman,” it doesn’t make sense. He keeps trying to make me “get it,” but I’m still having trouble with how much things cost. Why is Bill’s apartment more expensive than my farm? I don’t understand. I have space and the ability to grow and produce. He just has wood and steel in an ugly building.

Chautona: It’s all supply and demand. There isn’t a demand for farms but there’s a big one for apartments in a city and the city supplies are low, so the price goes up.

Willow: That makes sense to hear it, but when I see what I get for half what he paid for his little place, it doesn’t translate very well.

Chautona: I suppose that is right. What is the worst part of the changes in your new life? Aside from the loss of your mother, of course.

Willow: The cell phone. I don’t like being interrupted. People don’t understand why I don’t want to answer it when I’m doing something, but it makes me feel like a slave to someone else’s schedule. If I want to answer, I will. The only time I make myself answer when I don’t want to is for Chad. I do it because he’s convinced I’m going to kill myself out here someday and that he could have saved me if I had just had that stupid piece of plastic.

Chautona: Now there I totally get you. I don’t even carry a cell phone.

Willow: That’s it. I’m telling Chad that if my author doesn’t have to, neither do I.

Chautona: It won’t work. You’re keeping it. You won’t regret it.

Willow: We’ll see about that.

Chautona: Is there anything else you want to say about your story?

Willow: I guess I just want people to remember that their experiences aren’t the only ones out there. Mine are different–yours are. You made choices for my character based upon how you’ve lived, what you’ve observed, and what suits my personality best. If it seems implausible, perhaps it is because in the average (or even in most) American’s life, my entire existence is implausible, but isn’t that what fiction is about? Making the implausible come to life and touching people with it?
Then again, you lived five miles outside of a town the size of Fairbury and without electricity OR running water, in the DESERT, when you were in high school, so how implausible is it really?

Chautona:  True.  You know, I just thought of something else that reminds me of my childhood. Your mother was much like my father in how she created cool memories for you.  My dad was a master of that.  Kari did it much differently than Dad did, but the concepts… they are somewhat similar.

Chautona:  Well, thank you for your time and I hope you’re pleased with how things get edited.

Where Are All of my Readers?

1-pf

Diving into the next free episodes of HearthLand and Past Forward, hopefully!

We’re continuing on for the fourth week in our Summer Reading Program. If you’re new with us, Past Forward is the original series that I published in bite sized pieces called episodes. Over the course of the summer, we’re giving away those episodes each week, two at a time, along with 2 episodes each week of my current series, HearthLand.

So, Past Forward Episode 7 and Episode 8 will both be free today and tomorrow (Wednesday and Thursday).

If you’re willing to help share this with your friends, please consider doing one or the more of the following:

Please, step on over to Amazon and download them! And please, even if you’ve previously downloaded these episodes, grab ’em again.  MOST have been revised and updated. For those who are Kobo or Nook readers, email me.  I’ve got you covered. *please note: links to my books are affiliate links and as such, I may receive advertising compensation from Amazon.

Like our Facebook Page/Post
Tweet this giveaway
Pin the covers on Pinterest: Episode 7 and Episode 8.
Download Episode 7  and Episode 8.
Comment Request:
What would be the best part of pulling back from the demands of modern life?

How To Make an Average Monday Awesome

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Join us for our Summer of Reading Program! Each week this summer, we’re giving away a total of 4 episodes. Two of HearthLand, and two of Past Forward.

To start off the week,  HearthLand Episode 7  and Episode 8 will both be free Monday and Tuesday.

There will be a blog post on Wednesday, giving details on the Past Forward giveaway. Don’t miss it!

If you’re willing to help share this with your friends, please consider doing one or the more of the following:

Please, step on over to Amazon and download them! And please, even if you’ve previously downloaded these episodes, grab ’em again.  Some have been updated. For those who are Kobo or Nook readers, email me.  I’ve got you covered. *please note: links to my books are affiliate links and as such, I may receive advertising compensation from Amazon.

Like our Facebook Page/Post
Tweet this giveaway
Pin the covers on Pinterest: Episode 7 and Episode 8.
Download Episode 7  and Episode 8.
Comment Request:
Could you raise enough food to live off of for a year?

What Makes Today a WOW Day?

pfcoverWhy the Wednesday of Willow, of course! 😉

We’re continuing on for the third week in our Summer Reading Program. If you’re new with us, Past Forward is the original series that I published in bite sized pieces called episodes. Over the course of the summer, we’re giving away those episodes each week, two at a time, along with 2 episodes each week of my current series, HearthLand.

So, Past Forward Episode 5 and Episode 6 will both be free today and tomorrow (Wednesday and Thursday).

If you’re willing to help share this with your friends, please consider doing one or the more of the following:

Please, step on over to Amazon and download them! And please, even if you’ve previously downloaded these episodes, grab ’em again.  MOST have been revised and updated. For those who are Kobo or Nook readers, email me.  I’ve got you covered. *please note: links to my books are affiliate links and as such, I may receive advertising compensation from Amazon.

Like our Facebook Page/Post
Tweet this giveaway
Pin the covers on Pinterest: Episode 5 and Episode 6.
Download Episode 5  and Episode 6.
Comment Request: W
hat would be the worst thing about choosing not to use electricity?

What Makes Monday Marvelous Instead of Manic?

There’s nothing and EVERYTHING “Myner” about Mondays at Just the Write Escape!!!!

This is wee17-hlk three of our Summer of Reading Program. If you’re new, WELCOME! pull up a chair and enjoy. If you’ve been with us a while, I hope you’re able to fill in episodes or revisit ones that you loved. Either way, each week this summer, we’re giving away a total of 4 episodes. Two of HearthLand, and two of Past Forward.

To start off the week,  HearthLand Episode 5  and Episode 6 will both be free Monday and Tuesday.

There will be a blog post on Wednesday, giving details on the Past Forward giveaway. Don’t miss it!

If you’re willing to help share this with your friends, please consider doing one or the more of the following:

Please, step on over to Amazon and download them! And please, even if you’ve previously downloaded these episodes, grab ’em again.  Some have been updated. For those who are Kobo or Nook readers, email me.  I’ve got you covered. *please note: links to my books are affiliate links and as such, I may receive advertising compensation from Amazon.

Like our Facebook Page/Post
Tweet this giveaway
Pin the covers on Pinterest: Episode 5 and Episode 6.
Download Episode 5  and Episode 6.
Comment Request:
If you had to choose between raising chickens or sheep, which would it be?